Making Democracy Work

Appreciating Diversity Film Series

The Appreciating Diversity Film Series is a collaborative program of the Piedmont Appreciating Diversity Committee, DiversityWorks, and the Piedmont Chapter of the League of Women Voters. We endeavor to show six documentary films a year, each followed by some form of community dialogue. The mission of the Appreciating Diversity Film Series is to bring powerful documentaries that examine issues of diversity to community audiences. We aim to provide a venue that stimulates community dialogue about institutionalized power imbalances, broadens awareness, challenges assumptions, and encourages attendees to work towards a more just world.

MIND GAME, The Unquiet Journey of Chamique Holdsclaw

Mind/Game intimately chronicles the struggle with depression and bipolar disease experienced by star basketball player, Chamique Holdsclaw. She was hailed as the "female Michael Jordan" and seemed destined for a spectacular professional career as a 3-time NCAA champion and number one draft pick in the WNBA.

When her long-suppressed battle with mental disorders became apparent and began to affect her playing, she decided to go public with her condition, and in the process became a mental health advocate. She went on to face dramatic, unexpected challenges to her own recovery.

Mind/Game, produced by Rick Goldsmith and narrated by Glenn Close, tells her powerful story of courage, struggle, and redemption.

As unique as Chamique's journey is, it reflects the challenges faced by millions of individuals and families who are dealing with similar issues. The Appreciating Diversity Film Series presents this important documentary that explores the intersection of athletic stardom and mental health.

FREE screenings in both Piedmont and Oakland: Wednesday, March 15 Ellen Driscoll Playhouse, 325 Highland Ave, Piedmont Reception at 6:30 PM, screening 7 + 8 PM followed by community discussion

Sunday, March 19 New Parkway Theater, 474 24th Street, Oakland Screening 3 PM, followed by community discussion

13th

13th is a 2016 American documentary by director Ava DuVernay. The film explores the "intersection of race, justice and mass incarceration in the United States;"[2] it is titled after the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which freed the slaves and prohibited slavery (unless as punishment for a crime).

DuVernay's documentary opens with the facts that today the US has 5% of the world's population but 25% of the people in the world who are incarcerated. She demonstrates that slavery has been perpetuated in practices since the end of the American Civil War through such actions as criminalizing behavior and enabling police to arrest poor freedmen and force them to work for the state under convict leasing; suppression of African Americans by disenfranchisement, lynchings and Jim Crow; conservative Republicans declaring a war on drugs that weighed more heavily on minority communities and, by the late 20th century, mass incarceration of people of color in the United States. She examines the prison-industrial complex and the emerging detention-industrial complex, demonstrating how much money is being made by corporations from such incarceration.

Special one-time showing in Piedmont on April 21, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. with discussion following. Ellen Driscoll Theater, 325 Highland Avenue.

The Homestretch

Three smart, ambitious teens in Chicago challenge our stereotypes about homelessness as they fight to stay in school, graduate, and build a future. A powerful, original perspective on what it means to be young, homeless and building a future in America today.

"An amazing and important film with the potential to change the way we think about the problem of youth homelessness." Alex Kotlowitz, author of There Are No Children Here

FREE screenings in both Piedmont and Oakland: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 Ellen Driscoll Playhouse, 325 Highland Ave, Piedmont Reception at 6:30 PM, screening 7:00 pm followed by community discussion

Sunday, April 29, 2017 New Parkway Theater, 474 24th Street, Oakland Screening 3 PM, followed by community discussion